security

Roy Campbell

Roy Campbell

Roy Campbell

Sohaib and Sara Abbasi Professor of Computer Science

Research Interests:

Security assessment of SCADA networks, operating system dependability and security, active spaces for ubiquitous computing and the design of peer-to-peer distributed oeprating systems

Biography:

Professor Campbell's research interests are the problems, engineering and construction techniques of complex system software. Security, continuous media, and real-time control and pose a challenge, especially to operating system designers. Ubiquitous, distributed and parallel systems require complex resource management and efficient implementations. Object-oriented design aids organizing software, supports customization and offer new approaches to building dynamic distributed systems and middleware.

Samuel Talmadge King

Samuel T. King

Samuel T. King

Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering

URL:

Samuel T. King's Website

Research Interests:

Security, operating systems, and experimental computer systems.

Biography:

Samuel T. King is working to create more secure and error-prone software. Computer intrusions that result from insecure software lead to a number of problems, including the loss or corruption of sensitive data, costly and time-intensive cleanup efforts, and damage to a company's reputation. Additionally, software bugs can cause system outages that have been estimated to cost businesses billions of dollars each year.

Madhusudan Parthasarathy

Madhusudan Parthasarathy

Madhusudan Parthasarathy

Associate Professor of Computer Science

URL:

Madhusudan Parthasarathy's Website

Research Interests:

Software analysis and verification, Model checking: algorithms and tools, security, logic and automata theory.

Biography:

Madhusudan Parthasarathy applies formal methods to the development of trustworthy software. The Java Interface Synthesis Tool (JIST) is an example of that work. JIST is a set of automated tools and techniques to synthesize interfaces to Java modules.

Given a Java class file F that offers a set of method calls M, an interface to F is a small set of rules that capture the correct sequences of calls of methods in M. For example, if F is a file-manipulation program, the correct interface could be the set of sequences:

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